Hyzon and New Way Trucks building hydrogen-powered waste truck

Hyzon Motors Inc., a hydrogen fuel cell technology developer and global supplier of zero-emission heavy-duty fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs), and privately held New Way Trucks have signed a Joint Development Agreement (JDA) to develop a fuel cell powered refuse vehicle for the North American market.

The Sidewinder XTR will be the platform for the hydrogen-powered truck.

Hyzon and New Way plan to start the advanced phases of truck development, with the initial base FCEV prototype ready for refuse collection equipment integration. Hyzon will be responsible for the supply and integration of its advanced fuel cell technology and integrated powertrain, while New Way will be responsible for the supply and integration of the prototype’s Sidewinder XTR automated side-load refuse body, thereby combining both companies’ expertise to develop a sustainable refuse collection solution.

The development process is expected to leverage Hyzon’s real-world experience developing, assembling and deploying a hydrogen fuel cell refuse truck in operation since October 2023 in Australia with REMONDIS Australia, the Australian operation of one of the world’s largest recycling, service and water companies.

“Zero emission hydrogen fuel cell technology is the key to reducing emissions from many hard-to-abate industries, including refuse collection,” said Hyzon CEO Parker Meeks.

“Hyzon is primed to begin this partnership with New Way as we pursue a shared goal of decarbonizing the refuse industry. The operational capabilities of our Australian fuel cell refuse collection truck trial helped demonstrate that hydrogen fuel cell technology is a viable replacement for traditional diesel engines when it comes to heavy industry, and overcomes some of the inherent challenges identified with other zero emission technologies such as range anxiety, severe operating temperatures, and payload limitations.”

Across North America, Hyzon estimates that about 120,000 refuse trucks are currently operational, consuming a total of over 953 million gallons of diesel fuel annually. The integration of FCEVs into refuse collection fleets in North America provides an opportunity to help decarbonize the industry and reduce noise pollution from diesel trucks. Hyzon also expects fuel cell powered refuse trucks to deliver performance levels on par with both diesel and natural gas trucks.

“New Way has a successful history of deploying alternative powertrain refuse equipment across North America,” said Don Ross, New Way’s chief sales officer.

“Partnering with Hyzon to bring the continent’s first Class 8 FCEV refuse collection vehicle to life is a significant step in helping our customers meet their sustainability and decarbonization objectives.”

Initial customer trials for the partners’ first North American prototype truck are planned to begin in the first half of 2024 with a mix of public and private refuse fleets. Additionally, Hyzon is targeting initial commercial vehicle deliveries in 2025 on the back of potential successful trials.

Upon trial deployment, the trucks are expected to achieve up to a 125-mile driving range, 1,200 refuse cart lifts per route, an unladen weight significantly lighter than an equivalent battery electric truck, and a refueling time of 15 minutes based on performance observed to date in the REMONDIS trial. The Hyzon refuse trucks deliver competitive daily operational performance when compared to combustion engines.

“We look forward to learning how the Hyzon/New Way unit performs on route,” shared Eric Evans, New Way’s chief product officer.

“New Way distributors and key customers are excited about the prospect of alternative powertrain options that leverage the learnings of BEV without performance compromises while aligning with emerging hydrogen technology and infrastructure investment.”

Through trials, Hyzon’s goal is to demonstrate to customers and the industry that fuel cell-powered refuse vehicles can be the primary choice for any refuse management company interested in minimizing its carbon footprint and modernizing its fleets.